“I travel too much for work” by Robert Janeiro [Full Article]

June 14th, 2010

This excuse is great because every work trip turns into a mini vacation where food and exercise are neglected. This also tends to lead into the “I’ll start tomorrow” excuse. These mini vacations are stacked with morning pastries, fast food, and at times evening socials with plenty of alcohol. It’s almost as though we forget about what’s good for our health and turn to everything bad. Now, if this was once a year, once in a while or even once a month, FINE. Just don’t forget about yourself and always remember that the calories add up. By not being aware of your surroundings and what your putting into your system as well as neglecting your fitness routine, you are the only one to blame for your unhappiness. It’s so easy to use travel as an excuse to not take care of your health.

There are so many reasons to eat unhealthy foods when they are so convenient and readily available. It’s so easy to lie on a bed and watch television after a long hard day of business meetings and conferences as opposed to getting up and moving around. Instead of moving around to relieve some of the stresses we face during the day, we sit around and let that stress stew inside of us. Why not put a little effort into the things you do for your health and find out just how easy staying healthy is.

SOLUTIONS TO THE EXCUSE:

Answer these three simple questions, 1) Does the place you are staying have a fitness facility? No? 2) Do you have light weight travel equipment that you could use while in the comfort of your room? No? 3) Are you unable to get outside and move so that your body isn’t cooped up all day? Most hotels have some form of fitness facility; if not there is an abundance of light weight fitness equipment which can fit into your suitcase. If these options slip your mind, throw on some sweats and go for a jog or do some body weight exercises right in the comfort of your own room. What I’m trying to get at is there is no reason for you not to keep up with your healthy active living lifestyle. Even if you were off on a vacation with your family, take some time to visit the fitness facility, go for a nice swim in the relaxing pool or take a jog on the breathtaking beach. There really is no reason to stop doing what’s going to help keep you living healthy. The hardest part of a healthy nutrition and exercise routine is getting started. If you keep getting interrupted by days or weeks of unhealthy choices, you only hinder your progress. If you can push through the first 3-5 weeks of your program, the following weeks will be much easier to stay focused.

Be prepared for what lies ahead. Consider what is going to be served or where you will be eating. At times the menu can be seen in advance. Call a restaurant and ask for a healthy option, or prepare a healthy snack to take with you so that you won’t feel as hungry when you are out and around all the high calorie meals. Nothing is easy in life and therefore why should we expect our health to be easy to manage. Take the time to sit down and plan things out so that when the time arises, there is very little thinking to be done. Always keep in mind that everything in moderation is also alright. If you have the ability to indulge in the foods you want to eat while you’re away without overeating than its ok. If you can enjoy the foods you like to eat and live an active lifestyle than its ok.

If you’re not sure what to expect on your business trip in terms of food and snacks, pack a few sealable containers with fresh fruits and healthy spreads. Are you worried about what other people are going to say? Well they may say, “Look at Jim eating those celery sticks and peanut butter, no wonder he looks great and has a ton of energy.” Or you may get that group that laughs but as they shove one more deep fried pastry down their throat, you can almost hear their arteries becoming clogged and dirty. So next time your colleagues crack a joke about your packed lunch, just laugh and crack a joke about their packed arteries!

About Robert

Robert Janeiro is a Teacher and Personal trainer in the Toronto area. You can find out more about him and order his book “What’s your excuse?” at www.4fitness.ca

This excuse is great because every work trip turns into a mini vacation where food and exercise are neglected. This also tends to lead into the “I’ll start tomorrow” excuse. These mini vacations are stacked with morning pastries, fast food, and at times evening socials with plenty of alcohol. It’s almost as though we forget about what’s good for our health and turn to everything bad. Now, if this was once a year, once in a while or even once a month, FINE. Just don’t forget about yourself and always remember that the calories add up. By not being aware of your surroundings and what your putting into your system as well as neglecting your fitness routine, you are the only one to blame for your unhappiness. It’s so easy to use travel as an excuse to not take care of your health.

There are so many reasons to eat unhealthy foods when they are so convenient and readily available. It’s so easy to lie on a bed and watch television after a long hard day of business meetings and conferences as opposed to getting up and moving around. Instead of moving around to relieve some of the stresses we face during the day, we sit around and let that stress stew inside of us. Why not put a little effort into the things you do for your health and find out just how easy staying healthy is.

SOLUTIONS TO THE EXCUSE:

Answer these three simple questions, 1) Does the place you are staying have a fitness facility? No? 2) Do you have light weight travel equipment that you could use while in the comfort of your room? No? 3) Are you unable to get outside and move so that your body isn’t cooped up all day? Most hotels have some form of fitness facility; if not there is an abundance of light weight fitness equipment which can fit into your suitcase. If these options slip your mind, throw on some sweats and go for a jog or do some body weight exercises right in the comfort of your own room. What I’m trying to get at is there is no reason for you not to keep up with your healthy active living lifestyle. Even if you were off on a vacation with your family, take some time to visit the fitness facility, go for a nice swim in the relaxing pool or take a jog on the breathtaking beach. There really is no reason to stop doing what’s going to help keep you living healthy. The hardest part of a healthy nutrition and exercise routine is getting started. If you keep getting interrupted by days or weeks of unhealthy choices, you only hinder your progress. If you can push through the first 3-5 weeks of your program, the following weeks will be much easier to stay focused.

Be prepared for what lies ahead. Consider what is going to be served or where you will be eating. At times the menu can be seen in advance. Call a restaurant and ask for a healthy option, or prepare a healthy snack to take with you so that you won’t feel as hungry when you are out and around all the high calorie meals. Nothing is easy in life and therefore why should we expect our health to be easy to manage. Take the time to sit down and plan things out so that when the time arises, there is very little thinking to be done. Always keep in mind that everything in moderation is also alright. If you have the ability to indulge in the foods you want to eat while you’re away without overeating than its ok. If you can enjoy the foods you like to eat and live an active lifestyle than its ok.

If you’re not sure what to expect on your business trip in terms of food and snacks, pack a few sealable containers with fresh fruits and healthy spreads. Are you worried about what other people are going to say? Well they may say, “Look at Jim eating those celery sticks and peanut butter, no wonder he looks great and has a ton of energy.” Or you may get that group that laughs but as they shove one more deep fried pastry down their throat, you can almost hear their arteries becoming clogged and dirty. So next time your colleagues crack a joke about your packed lunch, just laugh and crack a joke about their packed arteries!

About Robert

Robert Janeiro is a Teacher and Personal trainer in the Toronto area. You can find out more about him and order his book “What’s your excuse?” at www.4fitness.ca

“I don’t have the time” by Robert Janeiro [Full Article]

June 7th, 2010

It’s amazing how something as simple as frequent effective exercise can be one of the best physical stress-reduction techniques available. Exercise not only improves your health and reduces stress caused by busy lifestyles; it also relaxes tense muscles and helps you to sleep. With a great night’s sleep and being better able to handle stressful situations that arise during the day, our bodies are better capable to deal with it all in a positive manner.

You may be asking just how much exercise do you have to do? Well it all depends on what your goals are. If you’re a busy business professional who is always on the go and are always using this excuse, do anything. Just make some time for yourself to do something that will allow you to release some steam from your busy lifestyle. Obviously somebody who is overweight lives a sedentary lifestyle and has poor eating habits should work at getting in 30 minutes of physical activity a day. Somebody trying to lose substantial weight or gain more muscular size should be looking at more intense and longer bouts of physical activity. When you are reading about what different Doctors or studies are saying about minimum amount of time required for health benefits, always keep in mind who the study is geared towards. Everybody has a different body and depending on the stage of your life you are in has an impact on just how much time is required for you. All in all if it isn’t going to be fun for you than you aren’t going to see it through. Make sure you are doing something that you will want to do on a daily basis. This is how you will see positive changes in yourself.

Why not use YOUR time to do things YOU enjoy. Exercise does not necessarily mean lifting heavy weights. Take a relaxing or vigorous walk; play outside with your kids or pet, wash the car, gardening, etc. What I’m trying to say is do something, ANYTHING. By doing things we enjoy, at the same time raising our heart rates we are releasing all the negative energy in our body. Not only will this help release the stress but it will help the body adapt to better deal with the same stressful situations in the future.

Another excuse associated with no time is not having enough energy. The funny thing is, the more exercise we do the more energy we have. Physical activity is invigorating and gives our body more energy for the next day. As we get more energy, we become more productive in our daily routines and we have more time to fit in the things we neglected before.

As much as we schedule in dentist appointments, doctors appointments, manicures, pedicures, facials etc, our personal time is usually the first appointment to be pushed back or totally erased from our agenda. We go to the doctors and dentist office for our health, so why not take the time to help ourselves be healthy.

With good time management skills you are in control of your time and your life, of your stress and energy levels. With an increase in energy and production levels you are able to maintain balance between your work, personal, and family lives. Finally, with good time management skills you have enough flexibility to respond to surprises or new opportunities. Here are a few tips to help you get started on great time management:

1. Avoid procrastination and get organized now- Don’t put things off any longer than needed. If you’re thinking about what needs to be done, plan to get it done. Set due dates earlier than needed to allow for surprises. By organizing yourself now rather than later you avoid the unexpected but at the same time are able to deal with the unexpected stress free.

2. Prioritize and decision making skills- Have the confidence to make good sound decisions and stick to them. Being able to prioritize and know what’s more important will greatly help when it comes to weeding through the endless amount of small tasks.

3. Goal setting- Whether it’s a fitness goal or a work deadline, goals are critical. Goals should never be impossible to reach and at the same time shouldn’t be so easy that you get no satisfaction from achieving them. Set several goals, both short term and long term. Reward yourself on the way to achieving that long term goal and always revisit your goals to not lose focus.

TRY THIS:

Select a day each month where you sit down with your calendar or organizer and plan what you’re doing for the month. The first thing to schedule in is your time and the things you enjoy. This doesn’t need to be a work out session, but something that you are going to do which will benefit yourself in a healthy way. If going to the gym is your thing, write (in pen) a time period that works for you in which you will be working out. Remember to keep in consideration travel time if required and how long you want to work out for. Once you have your entire month planned out, devise a reward system in which you treat yourself for consecutive number of workouts, or pounds lost, or time spent jogging rather than walking and so on. If something pops up later in the month that conflicts with your schedule and you are a little embarrassed that your workout is why you’re missing a meeting, just say you have a previous engagement scheduled and you will have to reschedule. Nobody needs to know, but honestly what’s the big secret. Have some confidence in what you are doing for yourself and don’t allow your life to be rescheduled because of somebody else’s schedule.

There are 1440 minutes in a day; I don’t think it’s too much to ask for 30 minutes out of that day for you!

About Robert

Robert Janeiro is a Teacher and Personal trainer in the Toronto area.  You can find out more about him and order his book “What’s your excuse?” at www.4fitness.ca

Hit The Road Healthy by Sherri Sacconaghi [Full Article]

May 31st, 2010

Whether we are traveling for work or vacation we are faced with the challenge of how to stay healthy on the road. Many of you may go on trips with the best of intentions, may even have thrown in a pair of running shoes with your flip flops or briefcase, but, once you get to your destination you become to overwhelmed with business meetings or para-sailing to focus on your health. Well, if this sounds familiar, listen up. The key to keeping it healthy on the road is to commit before you go.

It is not a matter of “If I have time” or ” I’ll just grab something to eat on the way”, you need to make a conscious choice to make eating healthy and exercising part of your trip. You will feel better, be more productive in meetings, be more willing to hit the jumbo slide with your kids at the pool. You will have a better trip!

Here are some tips to keep you on the right track:

1. Plan your exercise. Look online and book hotels that have a fitness center or pool. One of my favorites, given the choice, is a Westin. Not only do they have great workout facilities but they usually have a bowl of fruit sitting somewhere . If no gym is available at the hotel in which your conference is booked. Run the stairs, run the halls, bring an exercise band or your favorite yoga DVD. Remember, you committed before you left so this stuff should be in your bag. If traveling with your spouse or family, let them know ahead of time that each morning you will need an hour to exercise, who knows, they may be inspired to come with you.

2. Plan your food. You know you will be stuck on a plane at some point so be prepared. The following are my go to snacks that work great anytime, anyplace.

• Individual bags of oatmeal mixed with raisins, flaxseed, cinnamon, cacao powder. All you need is hot water and you can find that easily.

• Nuts and seeds. Include individual packets of Almond Butter (found at any New Seasons or Whole Foods).

• Carrots and Bananas travel really well.

• Crackers such as Ak Maks or Wasa. Goes great with the Almond Butter.

• Water, Water, Water. Best thing you can do for your body home or away.

3. While you are there. Stop at a local store on the way to the hotel. Grab yogurt, cheese sticks, soy milk, and fruit. When you get to the hotel, clean out the mini bar fridge, and set it all aside and stick in your healthy snacks. Some hotels will let you rent a fridge as well. No, I have never been charged for moving the mini bar items out. Be sure to use the fridge for leftovers from meals out so you don’t feel the pressure to eat the whole plate.

Now pull out those sneakers, hit the concierge and find the nearest walking/running route.

Whether you are schmoozing a client in Chicago or Kicking back on Kauai, make a plan and do it. Only you can make it happen.

About Sherri

Sherri Sacconaghi is a Holistic Health Coach dedicated to helping people look and feel better through healthy choices and lifestyle changes. To learn more check out www.themissionofnutrition.com

Whether we are traveling for work or vacation we are faced with the challenge of how to stay healthy on the road. Many of you may go on trips with the best of intentions, may even have thrown in a pair of running shoes with your flip flops or briefcase, but, once you get to your destination you become to overwhelmed with business meetings or parasailing to focus on your health. Well, if this sounds familiar, listen up. The key to keeping it healthy on the road is to commit before you go.

It is not a matter of “If I have time” or ” I’ll just grab something to eat on the way”, you need to make a conscious choice to make eating healthy and exercising part of your trip. You will feel better, be more productive in meetings, be more willing to hit the jumbo slide with your kids at the pool. You will have a better trip!

Here are some tips to keep you on the right track:

1. Plan your exercise. Look online and book hotels that have a fitness center or pool. One of my favorites, given the choice, is a Westin. Not only do they have great workout facilities but they usually have a bowl of fruit sitting somewhere . If no gym is available at the hotel in which your conference is booked. Run the stairs, run the halls, bring an exercise band or your favorite yoga DVD. Remember, you committed before you left so this stuff should be in your bag. If traveling with your spouse or family, let them know ahead of time that each morning you will need an hour to exercise, who knows, they may be inspired to come with you.

2. Plan your food. You know you will be stuck on a plane at some point so be prepared. The following are my go to snacks that work great anytime, anyplace.

· Individual bags of oatmeal mixed with raisins, flaxseed, cinnamon, cacao powder. All you need is hot water and you can find that easily.

· Nuts and seeds. Include individual packets of Almond Butter (found at any New Seasons or Whole Foods).

· Carrots and Bananas travel really well.

· Crackers such as Ak Maks or Wasa. Goes great with the Almond Butter.

· Water, Water, Water. Best thing you can do for your body home or away.

3. While you are there. Stop at a local store on the way to the hotel. Grab yogurt, cheese sticks, soy milk, and fruit. When you get to the hotel, clean out the mini bar fridge, and set it all aside and stick in your healthy snacks. Some hotels will let you rent a fridge as well. No, I have never been charged for moving the mini bar items out. Be sure to use the fridge for leftovers from meals out so you don’t feel the pressure to eat the whole plate.

Now pull out those sneakers, hit the concierge and find the nearest walking/running route.

Whether you are schmoozing a client in Chicago or Kicking back on Kauai, make a plan and do it. Only you can make it happen.

About Sherri

Sherri Sacconaghi is a Holistic Health Coach dedicated to helping people look and feel better through healthy choices and lifestyle changes. To learn more check out www.themissionofnutrition.com

10 Tips for Healthy Eating On Vacation By Andrea Hannon [Full Article]

May 24th, 2010

Summer time usually means vacation time. If you’re trying to lose weight or maintain your weight, don’t let one week set you back one month! And, if you’ve been incorporating healthy food choices for your family during the year, don’t use vacation time to throw it all out the window! Here are some eating tips to help you get the most out of your vacation without losing ground on your weight management or healthy eating efforts:

1. Research your food options before you leave on your trip. Search the internet for restaurants with healthy food options in the places you plan to visit. View on-line menus to make sure there are adequate healthy food options.

2. Limit your portions. Don’t be tempted by a restaurant’s Special of the Day, which can be loaded with calories and fat. Order half portions or share an entrée with a family member. If you want to go for the large meal, ask for a to-go box at the start of your meal and place half the meal in the box right away.

3. Make smart food choices. Choose items with menu descriptions such as: baked, braised, grilled, boiled, poached, roasted and steamed. Ask for sauces and dressings on the side, and don’t be afraid to make special requests. For example, ask for a side salad instead of fries.

4. Watch your veggies. Choosing vegetables with your meal is a healthy idea, but not if it is swimming in butter! Select vegetables that are steamed or grilled rather than sautéed or fried.

5. Limit alcohol and soda consumption. Alcohol tends to increase your appetite and provides extra calories and little or no nutrients. If you do drink, do so in moderation: No more than one drink a day for women and two drinks a day for men. If your family limits soda consumption at home, stick to the same rule on vacation and have it as an occasional treat.

6. Pay special attention to your body’s hunger and satiety signals. Try to avoid the “I’m on vacation!” mind set and keep in touch with your body’s natural signals for hunger and satiety. Eat because your body is truly hungry and needs the fuel, and be sure to stop eating when you feel about 80% full.

7. Treat yourself. Feelings of deprivation while on vacation can sabotage your weight loss efforts. One way to prevent this is to give yourself permission to have one “treat” a day. Doing so will prevent you from feeling “cheated” out of the foods you love and prevent you from giving in to every food whim or craving you have.

8. Pack healthy snacks. For any road trip or plane ride, it’s wise to pack healthy snacks with high protein and fiber content to keep you full. Trail mix is something that you can easily make and pack into baggies or Tupperware. If you’re travelling with children, have them put together their own trail mix by offering them healthy suggestions (e.g., whole wheat cereal, dried fruit, mini pretzels). They’re more apt to eat something that they prepare rather than something you make for them. If you can carry a cooler, string cheese and yogurt are healthy choices.

9. Bring your own breakfast. Instead of indulging in the hotel’s overabundant and unhealthy breakfast buffet, consider bringing your own breakfast. You’ll be eating healthier AND saving money. Bring oatmeal packets and add hot water from the hotel lobby or protein shake packets, milk or soy milk boxes, and a shaker.

10. Make water your best friend. Traveling can dehydrate you, especially if you have a long plane ride or spend a lot of time out in the sun or at the beach. If you can, be sure to stock your hotel room, backpack or car with plenty of water.

About Andrea

Andrea Hannon is owner of Healthy Living 4 You¸ a company that offers natural solutions for optimal health. She is a runner and the mother of two boys who are still trying to win the battle of not eating “the healthy cereal”. Fortunately, they take the vitamins that she markets, which she contributes to helping them avoid the H1N1 flu this year! For more information about her company and to read other “healthy living” blogs, go to www.healthyliving4you.info.

Summer time usually means vacation time. If you’re trying to lose weight or maintain your weight, don’t let one week set you back one month! And, if you’ve been incorporating healthy food choices for your family during the year, don’t use vacation time to throw it all out the window! Here are some eating tips to help you get the most out of your vacation without losing ground on your weight management or healthy eating efforts:

1. Research your food options before you leave on your trip. Search the internet for restaurants with healthy food options in the places you plan to visit. View on-line menus to make sure there are adequate healthy food options.

2. Limit your portions. Don’t be tempted by a restaurant’s Special of the Day, which can be loaded with calories and fat. Order half portions or share an entrée with a family member. If you want to go for the large meal, ask for a to-go box at the start of your meal and place half the meal in the box right away.

3. Make smart food choices. Choose items with menu descriptions such as: baked, braised, grilled, boiled, poached, roasted and steamed. Ask for sauces and dressings on the side, and don’t be afraid to make special requests. For example, ask for a side salad instead of fries.

4. Watch your veggies. Choosing vegetables with your meal is a healthy idea, but not if it is swimming in butter! Select vegetables that are steamed or grilled rather than sautéed or fried.

  1. Limit alcohol and soda consumption. Alcohol tends to increase your appetite and provides extra calories and little or no nutrients. If you do drink, do so in moderation: No more than one drink a day for women and two drinks a day for men. If your family limits soda consumption at home, stick to the same rule on vacation and have it as an occasional treat.
  2. Pay special attention to your body’s hunger and satiety signals. Try to avoid the “I’m on vacation!” mind set and keep in touch with your body’s natural signals for hunger and satiety. Eat because your body is truly hungry and needs the fuel, and be sure to stop eating when you feel about 80% full.
  3. Treat yourself. Feelings of deprivation while on vacation can sabotage your weight loss efforts. One way to prevent this is to give yourself permission to have one “treat” a day. Doing so will prevent you from feeling “cheated” out of the foods you love and prevent you from giving in to every food whim or craving you have.

8. Pack healthy snacks. For any road trip or plane ride, it’s wise to pack healthy snacks with high protein and fiber content to keep you full. Trail mix is something that you can easily make and pack into baggies or Tupperware. If you’re travelling with children, have them put together their own trail mix by offering them healthy suggestions (e.g., whole wheat cereal, dried fruit, mini pretzels). They’re more apt to eat something that they prepare rather than something you make for them. If you can carry a cooler, string cheese and yogurt are healthy choices.

9. Bring your own breakfast. Instead of indulging in the hotel’s overabundant and unhealthy breakfast buffet, consider bringing your own breakfast. You’ll be eating healthier AND saving money. Bring oatmeal packets and add hot water from the hotel lobby or protein shake packets, milk or soy milk boxes, and a shaker.

  1. Make water your best friend. Traveling can dehydrate you, especially if you have a long plane ride or spend a lot of time out in the sun or at the beach. If you can, be sure to stock your hotel room, backpack or car with plenty of water.

About Andrea

Andrea Hannon is owner of Healthy Living 4 You¸ a company that offers natural solutions for optimal health. She is a runner and the mother of two boys who are still trying to win the battle of not eating “the healthy cereal”. Fortunately, they take the vitamins that she markets, which she contributes to helping them avoid the H1N1 flu this year! For more information about her company and to read other “healthy living” blogs, go to www.healthyliving4you.info.

No Equipment Workout! By ABBS Fitness [Full Article]

May 18th, 2010

Many times when traveling you may feel that you don’t have the time or resources to locate a gym for a quick workout. Hotel fitness centers may be too crowded or you may not feel like leaving your hotel room.

A quick, basic workout that will keep you going can be done in your room without gym equipment. This workout can be done in as little as 20-30 minutes.

It is important to include stretching in your workout routine. Begin with 5-10 minutes of stretching. The following stretches will help warm up your muscles:

Stretches:

Standing Runners (calf) Stretch – one foot back with knee straight and heel flat on floor; other leg should be in front of you and bent. Slowly lean forward until you feel a stretch in the calf.

Half Kneeling Stretch (hips/quads) – Keep abs tight and maintain erect posture.

Standing Toe Reach (hamstrings) – standing with feet together, slowly reach toward toes until a stretch is felt in back of thighs. (If you have a bad/sore back trying lying on your back, both legs flat, lift one leg in the air and grab behind the knee. Try to straighten your leg)

Chest Doorway Stretch – standing in door jam with hands on door frame shoulder height. Slowly walk into doorway until a pulling is felt in the chest.

Trunk Rotation – lying on back with feet/knees together and bent to 90 degrees. Arms should be out to the side. Slowly rotate legs to one side while turning head to opposite side.

Hold each stretch for at least 20 – 30 seconds.

Circuit Workout:

20 Squats (use a chair if you’re not sure how to do these – sit and stand)

10 push ups – body should not sag; go deep enough so elbows are at 90 degrees (do push ups on knees if you cant do regular push ups)

10 bridges – lying on back, legs bent to 90 degrees, lift butt up while keeping abs tight and clenching glutes

“Superman” – lying on stomach, raise arms and legs while keeping stomach clenched – hold 30 seconds.

Plank – get up phase of push up position, hold for 15 seconds (keep abs tight – body should not sag – keep straight as, yes, you guessed it, a PLANK).

20 Elbow-to-knee crunches – lie on back with legs flat on floor; hands behind head, slowly raise up as if doing a crunch, rotate upper body as if trying to touch elbow to OPPOSITE knee, repeat both sides.

5- 10 Chair dips – (MAKE SURE CHAIR IS SECURE) – sit on edge of chair with hands placed on each side of chair (front edge). Legs should be out in front of you slightly bent. Slide off chair; now you are supported with arms. Slowly lower you’re self until your elbows are just above 90 degrees, push up.

10 Chair curls – there is usually a wood desk chair with a back in the room. Stand behind chair with one hand on each side of the chair, elbows at your sides. Begin curling.

10 Luggage Shoulder press – grab a piece of luggage, one hand on each end. Press over head. Keep abs tight if done standing.

You can add reps if necessary. Go through the circuit 1-3 times depending on the amount of work you want to do.

About Abbs Fitness

ABBS Fitness trainers, Chris and Jenny, have a combined 25 years of experience as Licensed Physical Therapists Assistants and ACE Certified Personal Trainers. Both trainers utilize valuable experience in the field of physical therapy when working with private, corporate, and community clients to achieve desired fitness goals.

Jenny Barton can be reached at jlbarton58@yahoo.com

Chris Aiello can be reached at caiello@wi.rr.com

Many times when traveling you may feel that you don’t have the time or resources to locate a gym for a quick workout. Hotel fitness centers may be too crowded or you may not feel like leaving your hotel room.

A quick, basic workout that will keep you going can be done in your room without gym equipment. This workout can be done in as little as 20-30 minutes.

It is important to include stretching in your workout routine. Begin with 5-10 minutes of stretching. The following stretches will help warm up your muscles:

Hold each stretch for at least 20 – 30 seconds.

-standing runners (calf) stretch – one foot back with knee straight and heel flat on floor; other leg should be in front of you and bent. Slowly lean forward until you feel a stretch in the calf.

-half kneeling stretch (hips/quads) – Keep abs tight and maintain erect posture.

-standing toe reach (hamstrings) – standing with feet together, slowly reach toward toes until a stretch is felt in back of thighs.

(If you have a bad/sore back trying lying on your back, both legs flat, lift one leg in the air and grab behind the knee. Try to straighten your leg)

-Chest doorway stretch – standing in door jam with hands on door frame shoulder height. Slowly walk into doorway until a pulling is felt in the chest.

-Trunk rotation – lying on back with feet/knees together and bent to 90 degrees. Arms should be out to the side. Slowly rotate legs to one side while turning head to opposite side.

Begin Workout:

20 Squats (use a chair if you’re not sure how to do these – sit and stand)

10 push ups – body should not sag; go deep enough so elbows are at 90 degrees (do push ups on knees if you cant do regular push ups)

10 bridges (lying on back, legs bent to 90 degrees, lift butt up while keeping abs tight and clenching glutes)

“Superman” – lying on stomach, raise arms and legs while keeping stomach clenched – hold 30 seconds.

Plank – get up phase of push up position, hold for 15 seconds (keep abs tight – body should not sag – keep straight as, yes, you guessed it, a PLANK).

20 Elbow-to-knee crunches – lie on back with legs flat on floor; hands behind head, slowly raise up as if doing a crunch, rotate upper body as if trying to touch elbow to OPPOSITE knee, repeat both sides.

5- 10 Chair dips – (MAKE SURE CHAIR IS SECURE) – sit on edge of chair with hands placed on each side of chair (front edge). Legs should be out in front of you slightly bent. Slide off chair; now you are supported with arms. Slowly lower you’re self until your elbows are just above 90 degrees, push up.

10 Chair curls – there is usually a wood desk chair with a back in the room. Stand behind chair with one hand on each side of the chair, elbows at your sides. Begin curling.

10 Luggage Shoulder press – grab a piece of luggage, one hand on each end. Press over head. Keep abs tight if done standing.

*Add reps if necessary. You can run through the circuit 1-3 times depending on the amount of work you want to do.

ABBS Fitness trainers, Chris and Jenny, have a combined 25 years of experience as Licensed Physical Therapists Assistants and ACE Certified Personal Trainers. Both trainers utilize valuable experience in the field of physical therapy when working with private, corporate, and community clients to achieve desired fitness goals.

Jenny Barton can be reached at jlbarton58@yahoo.com

Chris Aiello can be reached at caiello@wi.rr.com

Using Bands to workout while Traveling by Michael Mednick [Full Article]

May 11th, 2010

Do you ever find yourself frustrated when you get to your destination from traveling only to be met with a not so nice workout facility? Or how about those lengthy hours in the airport between flights? Or even better yet… are you just not able to find the time in your busy traveling schedule to even get a quick workout in? Or you possibly might just want to do a little workout in the comfort of your own room!

Welcome to the “reality” of traveling!! First and foremost my name is Michael Mednick and I’ve spent many hours of my life traveling as well as finding myself in all of the above situations. My whole concept with wellness while you travel is to prepare and be ready to MOVE! When you prepare you’re more apt to adapt to your circumstances that arise while you travel. And movement is the “key” in feeling better. Here are some basic suggestions that I can give you while you travel … my favorite choice of equiptement that I would suggest for you to have while traveling would be a resistance band or tube. They are very easy to use as well as easy to travel with and most importantly … they get the job done!

I suggest the following exercises:

  • Upper Back Squeeze with the band or tube (holding onto the band or tube with your hands are shoulder width apart, in front of your body and simply pulling the band or tube outward towards your sides with the band or tube touching you across the chest. Moving energy through your body and into your rear shoulders.)
  • Push Ups are always a great exercise weather your doing them against a wall or on the ground.
  • Wall Sitting is a great stabilizer for your entire body and a all around great lower body strengthener (sit against a wall or door as if you were sitting on a chair, make sure that you keep your feet and legs shoulder distance apart and that your knees aren’t over your feet.)
  • Bicep Curl with a band or tube is good as well (put the band or tube under your feet while you’re standing shoulder distance apart and simply curl your arms upwards to create a pump in your biceps.)

I hope these simple yet effective exercises help you stay fit while you travel and remember to always “move” your energy with positive attitude.

About Michael

To learn more about myself and our company Medstac’s Inc. please visit us on the web at www.Medstac.com

Medstac has created a custom designed resistance band that has been designed with the traveler in mind. This band is unlike any other band because we’ve printed a complete workout routine directly onto the band itself! The Original Med’s Band makes it virtually impossible not to achieve a great workout. Everything you need is right there on the band. For more information please contact us at 714 717-3944 or e mail Michael at Michael@Medstac.com

Get Your Strength Workout with Bands to go…Never Leave Home Without Them by Trish Muse [Full Article]

May 4th, 2010

Have you ever been religiously working out and reaping solid results when it all comes to a screeching halt because of a business trip, family vacation or unexpected travel? Soon you feel like you’re moving in slow motion, regaining lost weight while you morph into a marshmallow physique. Don’t let your travel plans sabotage your workout and results. With some planning, resources and expert guidance you can seamlessly transition from a home or gym workout to a travel exercise program with some safe, simple, creative and fun modifications. Hotel exercise programs can keep you on track towards your fitness goals while on the road. So hit the road and follow these tips.

Remember to pack elastic bands or tubes to use as resistance to continue your strength program. They will travel lightly and should not provide any problem clearing security. Most importantly, if you bring bands/tubes offering a variety of resistance represented by different colors by most manufacturers, you can continue and progress upper and lower body exercises. Lighter resistance can be used for smaller groups like your biceps or triceps.

When it’s time to progress try shortening the band/tube by adjusting your grip and leaving the excess as a tail. This will shorten the band, which increases the tension or resistance. By exercising with a shorter band your exercise will be harder to do. This will provide a resistance overload or stimulus for your muscles. Your muscles will respond to the harder workload by getting stronger, possibly bigger and may be more defined.

Another way to boost your strength program with bands/tubes is to double up in the number of bands. Use 2 light resistance bands together. By doubling the bands it will be harder to perform an exercise. Again this provides a strength stimulus to assist you in the development of strength and definition. This trick of the trade may offer a load between the next color progression.

Make your travel as well as all your workouts fun. To boost the fun factor with bands perform upper and lower body exercises simultaneously. For example with the band under your feet do a squat hold the ends with your hands. Squat and return to standing against resistance by pulling the ends up followed by a bicep curl. When performing the bicep curl keep your elbows against your body during all phases of the exercise while controlling both the up (concentric) and down (eccentric) phases of the exercise.

When using elastic resistance control the bands so that they don’t slacken until you’re completely finished with your set. Keep the bands tight when exercising. This will ensure your muscles stay under tension long enough for you to realize your goals and maintain your fitness level.

Do your resistance exercise as a circuit. Perform an upper body exercise for 1 minute. Then you have approximately 20 seconds to move to the next station. The next station may be cardiovascular exercise for 3 minutes or a lower body exercise for 1 minute. Your entire circuit may actually only be 4-10 exercises, which you repeat in the circuit. The benefit of the circuit is to increase fun, decrease resistance, increase endurance, burn calories, increase cardiovascular exercise and decrease the risk for repetitive overuse injuries and overtraining so that you can continue to exercise for the long haul.

Try to use the most elongation or stretch when using bands/tubes in order to get the most resistance. This will make the exercise more challenging and facilitate the development of strength. Resist the tendency to let the bands snap to prevent injury to yourself or others nearby.

Be safe by limiting contact of the bands with rough surfaces. This will help to avoid tears and rips that will cause breakage and potential injury when breakage occurs.

What’s the formula for success? Perform 1-3 sets of 8-12 reps to develop both strength and endurance.

Keep the bands opposite your direction of pull to apply the resistance to your muscle correctly and most effectively. For example to work the biceps anchor the band below your bicep on the floor as far away as you can tolerate.

Combine 2 colors to boost the resistance when you need to progress your program or need more of a challenge and results. This may work nicely for stronger individuals such as men who tend to lift heavier weights in the gym but have a difficult time replicating their workout when traveling.

As a bonus one of my favorite exercises is to perform push ups with an elastic band placed across my back just under my shoulder blades. Once in push up position anchor the bands under your hands. Push up against the resistance of the bands and feel how an old standard exercise is reinvented.

You can also get online fitness guidance while traveling if you have a high-speed Internet connection. Visit www.physiic.com for an online fitness class, personal training or small group personal training that you can do right from your hotel room or where ever you can exercise with internet access.

About Trish

Trish Muse (MPT, CSCS) is a physical therapist, veteran pharmaceutical representative and published author. Frequently featured in Essence, Heart and Soul, Self and Health magazines as well as several others as a fitness consultant, Trish provides continuing education internationally for fitness professionals and physical therapists. She is currently pursuing her Doctor of Science in Physical Therapy. As the owner of Body Productions, Inc. she is a popular National Strength and Conditioning Association Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist, respected American College of Sports Medicine certified Health Fitness Instructor and Wellcoaches licensed Wellness Coach in the Washington DC area. She is a Polestar certified Pilates practitioner and East Coast Fitness Ambassador for Doce Vida Fitness, Inc. Trish is the star and creator of the popular exercise videos, Ab Attack, Body Management, The Workstation Workout, Core Attack, ”The Resistance” and Strength Attack.

Contact Trish at www.bodyproductions.com

Exercise on the Road by Chris De Angelis [Full Article]

April 19th, 2010

The key to getting it done on the road is to keep it simple. Remember, simple and easy are not the same; easy implies not difficult, simple means not complicated. Here are a few things I like to do when on the road.

Squats are number one in my book. They work all the major muscles of the leg as well as your postural muscles and you don’t need any additional weight, simply use your body weight. Try knocking out 300 bodyweight squats and you tell me if it doesn’t rival the best “legs” day you’ve ever had in a gym.

Pushups are another simple exercise. Can’t do pushups on your toes? That’s ok, perform them from your knees. Still can’t seem to do pushups? Lean against a dresser of even the edge of the bed. An advanced move is the plyometric-pushup. From the standard pushup position, drop down then explosively push up so that your hands momentarily leave the ground.

Crunches can be done virtually anywhere. For best results, place your feet up on a couch or chair. This ensures that the abdominal muscles are engaged during the crunching movement and minimizes hip flexor involvement.

Jumping jacks and squat thrusts, the old gym class favorites, are also a great way to keep your heart rate up between strength exercises.

So, how do you tie it all together? Circuit training is your best bet when at home or on the road. Here’s how it might look:

• 10 pushups

• 20 crunches

• 30 squats

• 50 jumping jacks

• Rinse and repeat up to 5 times or get as many rounds in 20 minutes

Spending 20 minutes doing some simple exercises can keep you on track when you’re on the road. If there is no gym, you don’t need equipment and you can easily perform all exercises in a 5’ x 10’ space. Now, let’s just hope your hotel room is bigger than that. Pure. Simple. Fit.

Chris De Angelis is a professional member of the NSCA and a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist. He brings 19 years of fitness experience and enthusiasm to provide Bridgewater Boot Camp clients with positive motivation and inspiration, goal setting, monitoring and achievement. Chris can be reached at: chris@bridgewaterbootcamp.com.

www.bridgewaterbootcamp.com

www.facebook.com/bridgewater.bootcamp

Healthy Food Choices On The Move by Alicia Kirschenheiter [Full Article]

April 12th, 2010

Either as a professional or a person who loves to travel, we all remember to research the place we are planning to stay. Ok, maybe not research but at least take a look at the pictures on the web and hope to not see any bedbugs from the photos. We also remember to pack the essentials – clean clothes, toothbrush, cell phone charger of course – but what a lot of us forget is to research the food options to allow us to make the best choices available. Now, of course I am not saying we should choose a destination solely based on its proximity to a smoothie café, but knowing what’s available, what’s close and what’s on the menu can equal what’s healthy while on the trip.

My 5 suggestions for making the best choices possible:

• The Know Before You Go – when booking your reservation always look at the menus of the hotel, bed & breakfast, inn or in a pinch, check if there is distant relatives’ or friends house nearby. Look for light menus, healthy meal choices, and a variety of fresh vegetable and fish choices. It may make the difference between staying somewhere where a late night menu might mean a cheeseburger and fries or a fresh vegetable & cheese plate.

• Cook much? When I am vacation I hate to cook. However, for some other reason entirely, when traveling for business, I do sometimes choose a hotel or motel that has a kitchen. It allows you to prepare meals on your schedule that fits your healthy eating needs. Sometimes it actually allows me to cook things I would never have time to at home. The downside, knowing ahead of time where to go shopping.

• Pack the Essentials – Only you know your needs. For me, planning ahead means prepackaged protein shakes or bars, fruit bars and vitamin C packets. It’s not five star cuisine but it does carry me through when there are limited options. Some other things that travel well, nuts of all kinds, dried fruit, granola bars and depending on whether driving or flying hard boiled eggs, lemons, limes and seltzer in a small travel cooler of course.

• Check out the Local Flavor – Sometimes when we travel we are offered a cornucopia of tastes and flavors never available to us anywhere else. For example, I had never tasted a Mexican spice, “chile pequin” until la trip to Riveria Maya Mexico. It was served with an assortment of fresh fruits & vegetables. Certainly made me eat a whole lot more fruits and vegetables and was a healthy alternative to some other choices like chips and guacamole or fried plantains.

• The Fast Food Dilemma – We all know it, we have all done it. Driving through parts unknown with both sides of the street littered with fast food joints and everything artery clogging for under 2 dollars. Best suggestion – give in. BUT…and this is a BIG BUT…make healthier choices when you are there. When you can, opt for grilled vs. fried, salads vs. french fries, bottled water vs. soda and skip the perks like cheese bacon & sauce.

The truth to healthy travel is to maintain your lifestyle ideals while on the go. If being well is important to you then making the preparations while you travel that you already make in your everyday at home life shouldn’t be too bad.

Be well & safe travel.

About Alicia:

Alicia Kirschenheiter is the owner Evolution Total Wellness.  You can find out more information about Alicia and get in touch with her at:

www.linkedin.com/in/evolutiontotalwellness

www.dailyevolution.com

www.oscarandotis.com

Pardon me; do you have a minute to spare? How about 30 minutes? By About Chris De Angelis [Full Article]

March 30th, 2010

I know what your answer to this will be, “hell no”.  If you’re like most business travelers, you feel like you don’t have enough time in the day, let alone an extra 30 minutes.  Well listen up, I’m about to tell you where to find extra 30 minutes.

Cardio… some of us love it, some of us hate it.  Whichever group you fall in to, cardiovascular training (conditioning) is an integral part of any exercise program.  A solid cardiovascular base provides the foundation for swimming, running, cycling and other sports, as well as providing the recovery mechanisms for strength training and other vigorous activities (sprinting, running up a flight of stairs, moving furniture).

The problem arises when we try to fit 60 minutes of cardio into a day that’s already packed with meetings and afterhours social activities.  I offer as an alternative High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT). HIIT addresses the need for cardiovascular training, strength training, fat burning and most importantly time.  HIIT develops several energy systems at once and burns more calories than steady state cardio at a moderate pace (AKA long slow distance (LSD) training).  The calorie burn actually continues after exercise cessation while your body repairs itself and returns to homeostasis!

Here’s how to do it: Perform alternating bouts of sprints and active rest exercises at a work to rest ratio of 1:2 (30 seconds : 60 seconds).  HIIT can be done with almost any mode of exercise and pairs well with swimming, cycling, running, and even some forms of weightlifting.  You could even get creative and perform jump rope (work) and crunches (rest) for the 1:2 time durations.  Any combination of high intensity work followed by active rest will work.  High intensity means it would be very difficult or impossible to have a conversation with someone.  Active rest means easy to have a conversation (conversation pace).

So, if you find yourself in a hotel who’s “Fitness Center” is no more than a gutted room with a few treadmills, here’s how to do it: set the treadmill at 8-9 mph and run for 30 seconds, lower the speed to 4-5 mph and walk or slow jog for 60 seconds.  Repeat this cycle for 30 minutes (20 rounds). Maybe your gym only has a pool and no formal fitness center.  You can apply the same principle of work to rest but use distance.  Swim 1 lap at maximum exertion and then swim 2 at a moderate rate.  Continue for 30 minutes or a set number of laps.

HIIT is very demanding and should be incorporated into your exercise program moderately at first.  Beginners should start with 10 rounds and a lower work intensity and then increase the work interval and eventually the speed. After performing 30 minutes of HIIT, you will have burned more calories than if you ran for 60 minutes at a moderate pace.  You will also reap benefits of improved strength from the sprint training.

So, give HIIT a try.  The switching of pace is sure to keep the workout challenging and I think you’ll be pleased with the results.  Now, what will you do with that extra 30 minutes?

About Chris De Angelis

Chris De Angelis is a professional member of the NSCA and a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist.  He brings 19 years of fitness experience and enthusiasm to provide Bridgewater Bootcamp clients with positive motivation and inspiration, goal setting, monitoring and achievement.  Chris can be reached at chris@bridgewaterbootcamp.com.

www.bridgewaterbootcamp.com

www.facebook.com/bridgewater.bootcamp

I know what your answer to this will be, “hell no”. If you’re like most business travelers, you feel like you don’t have enough time in the day, let alone an extra 30 minutes. Well listen up, I’m about to tell you where to find extra 30 minutes.

Cardio… some of us love it, some of us hate it. Whichever group you fall in to, cardiovascular training (conditioning) is an integral part of any exercise program. A solid cardiovascular base provides the foundation for swimming, running, cycling and other sports, as well as providing the recovery mechanisms for strength training and other vigorous activities (sprinting, running up a flight of stairs, moving furniture).

The problem arises when we try to fit 60 minutes of cardio into a day that’s already packed with meetings and afterhours social activities. I offer as an alternative High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT).

HIIT addresses the need for cardiovascular training, strength training, fat burning and most importantly time. HIIT develops several energy systems at once and burns more calories than steady state cardio at a moderate pace (AKA long slow distance (LSD) training). The calorie burn actually continues after exercise cessation while your body repairs itself and returns to homeostasis!

Here’s how to do it: Perform alternating bouts of sprints and active rest exercises at a work to rest ratio of 1:2 (30 seconds : 60 seconds). HIIT can be done with almost any mode of exercise and pairs well with swimming, cycling, running, and even some forms of weightlifting. You could even get creative and perform jump rope (work) and crunches (rest) for the 1:2 time durations. Any combination of high intensity work followed by active rest will work. High intensity means it would be very difficult or impossible to have a conversation with someone. Active rest means easy to have a conversation (conversation pace).

So, if you find yourself in a hotel who’s “Fitness Center” is no more than a gutted room with a few treadmills, here’s how to do it: set the treadmill at 8-9 mph and run for 30 seconds, lower the speed to 4-5 mph and walk or slow jog for 60 seconds. Repeat this cycle for 30 minutes (20 rounds).

Maybe your gym only has a pool and no formal fitness center. You can apply the same principle of work to rest but use distance. Swim 1 lap at maximum exertion and then swim 2 at a moderate rate. Continue for 30 minutes or a set number of laps.

HIIT is very demanding and should be incorporated into your exercise program moderately at first. Beginners should start with 10 rounds and a lower work intensity and then increase the work interval and eventually the speed.

After performing 30 minutes of HIIT, you will have burned more calories than if you ran for 60 minutes at a moderate pace. You will also reap benefits of improved strength from the sprint training.

So, give HIIT a try. The switching of pace is sure to keep the workout challenging and I think you’ll be pleased with the results. Now, what will you do with that extra 30 minutes?

About Chris De Angelis

Chris De Angelis is a professional member of the NSCA and a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist. He brings 19 years of fitness experience and enthusiasm to provide Bridgewater Bootcamp clients with positive motivation and inspiration, goal setting, monitoring and achievement. Chris can be reached at chris@bridgewaterbootcamp.com.

www.bridgewaterbootcamp.com

www.facebook.com/bridgewater.bootcamp